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THE ATARI 810 

DISK DRIVE 

THE ATARI® 800™COMPUTER SYSTEM 




OWNER'S GUIDE 



A 

ATARI 8 



A Warner Communications Company Q 



The door on the ATARI® 810" Disk Drive unit 
should be kept CLOSED when moving the unit. 
This will help protect the delicate internal 
mechanisms from damage. 




ATARI 



ATARI, INC. 

CONSUMER DIVISION 

1265 Borregas Avenue 

Sunnyvale, CA 94086 



Printed in U.S.A. 



C015554 Rev. A 



A 

ATARI 



PRODUCT UPDATE 

ATARI HOME COMPUTER SYSTEM 



ATARI" 810™ DISK DRIVE PRODUCT UPDATE 

As you may have noticed, your ATARI 810 Disk Drive looks slightly 
different than that shown on the box and in the manual. To fulfill in- 
creased demand for this product, we are now utilizing two front 
panels for the ATARI 810 Disk Drive. 

All ATARI 810 Disk Drives perform to the same high standards. We've 
gone to great lengths to assure that they are completely compatible— 
that they read and write to the same diskettes, use the same Disk 
Operating System, and perform identically in use with other ATARI 
Home Computer products. 

Your new disk drive does not have an eject button since the door 
opening design makes it easy to insert and remove diskettes. To do 
so, simply lift the tab, insert or remove the diskette, then lower the tab 
to its original position. 



©1982 Atari, Inc. 
All righls reserved 



C06I 104 REV. A 




With the addition of the ATARI 
810™ Disk Drive to your ATARI 
Home Computer, you have 
greatly increased the efficiency 
of your system. Several 
individual files can be stored on 
a diskette and each file can be 
accessed directly, by name. 
The disk drive transfers data to 
your computer much faster than 
the ATARI 410™ Program 
Recorder. 

Your ATARI 810 Disk Drive is 
simple to connect and easy to 
use. Follow the step-by-step 
instructions on the following 
pages. 



CONNECTING 
YOUR ATARI 810 
DISK DRIVE 



ITurn off the power to all 
parts of your computer 
system. 




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2 Plug the AC Power Adapter 
into the wall socket. Plug 
the smaller end into the hole 
marked PWR on the back of the 
disk drive. 



3 Plug one end of the I/O Data 
Cord into the jack on the 
side of the computer console 
marked PERIPHERAL. Plug the 
other end into one of the jacks 
marked I/O CONNECTORS on 
the back of the disk drive. If you 
have an ATARI 410 Program Re- 
corder, plug it into the remaining 
I/O CONNECTOR jack. 

Since your television creates a 
strong magnetic field, your 
ATARI 810 Disk Drive should be 
placed as far away from it as 
possible. This will help protect 
the magnetic head in the disk 
drive from losing its sensitivity. 




4 Turn on the disk drive. 
When the red BUSY light 
goes off, open the door to the 
disk drive by pushing the rec- 
tangular button to the left of the 
ATARI 810 label. 



5 Insert the diskette you want 
to use and close the disk 
drive door. 




6 Turn on the computer. If 
you're using the ATARI 
BASIC cartridge, your disk drive 
is ready for use when the 
READY prompt appears on the 
screen. If you're using a car- 
tridge or program other than 
ATARI BASIC, read the instruc- 
tions for that program to find out 
how to use it with your disk 
drive. 



CONNECTING 
MORE THAN ONE 
DISK DRIVE 



You can attach up to four ATARI 
810 Disk Drives, as well as other 
components, to your ATARI Home 
Computer. Disk drives and 
the Program Recorder are con- 
nected to each other in a "daisy 
chain" using the data cords sup- 
plied with each component. 



You may have noticed that there 
are two I/O CONNECTOR jacks 
on the back of each disk drive. 
To install multiple drives, con- 
nect a data cord from the I/O 
CONNECTOR of the first disk 
drive to the I/O CONNECTOR of 



the computer console. Then con- 
nect the next disk drive by run- 
ning a data cord from it to the re- 
maining I/O CONNECTOR on 
the first. 




If you have more than one ATARI 
810 Disk Drive, you must set two 
small switches on each disk 
drive so that the computer knows 
which drive you are referring to 
in your programs or commands. 
You must always have one disk 
drive in the chain set as Drive 1 . 



ITurn off the power to the 
disk drive, then turn the disk 
drive so that you are looking at 
the back of it. 



2 Using a pen or a screw- 
driver, set the Drive Code 
No. switches to match the Drive 
Code number shown in the 
diagrams. Set Disk Drive 2 to 
match DRIVE No. 2, etc. 




TAKING CARE 

OF YOUR 

DISKETTES 



The recording surface of a 
diskette is similar to the record- 
ing surface on a program cas- 
sette. Each is coated with a 
magnetic material that stores 
your data. Careful handling and 
storage of your diskettes ensures 
longer life. 

Diskettes are enclosed in a black 
envelope. Most diskettes have a 
small notch in the edge, called 
the "write-protect notch." By 
covering this notch with the rec- 
tangular tabs provided by the 
manufacturer, you can prevent 
any accidental computer opera- 
tions that might destroy the data 
on the diskette. 



>v _/ 



Do not use pencil erasers on diskette 
labels. Eraser dust is abrasive and will 
damage the diskette. 




Do not write on your diskettes with a 
pencil or a ball-point pen. The sharp 
point of a pencil or ball-point pen can 
score the surface of the diskette. Use a 
felt-tip pen to mark the diskette label or 
write on the label before you put it on 
the diskette. 





Do not store your diskettes in direct 
sunlight. Keep them away from any 
excessive heat. 



Never wet or wash a diskette. Use a soft 
brush or compressed air from a spray 
can to remove any dust from the surface. 





Do not bend your diskettes; they must 
turn freely in the protective envelope. 
Handle them with care when loading or 
unloading. 



Store each diskette in its paper sleeve 
and store them standing on edge to pre- 
vent damage to the magnetic surface. 





Because the diskette turns inside the 
envelope, damage to the envelope can 
result in damage to the diskette. 



Never touch the diskette where it is ex- 
posed through the diskette envelope. 
Fingerprints can damage the magnetic 
medium. 





Store your diskettes away from your 
television set. The strong magnetic fields 
produced by the television can partially 
erase the data stored. Keep your disk- 
ettes away from electrical devices (as 
well as the telephone). 



Do not attach paper clips to your 
diskettes. 



WHERE TO GO 
FROM HERE 



The ATARI Home Computer 
System is designed for modular 
expansion. All ATARI peripheral 
devices plug together quickly, 
making it easy to get the new ad- 
dition to your system on-line and 
functioning . This means that 
your system can grow as your 
needs grow. 

ATARI 810 DISK DRIVE 
Now that you have purchased 
one disk drive, why would you 
need more? You'll find that ad- 
ditional disk drives in your 
system increase the amount of 
data you can store and retrieve 
quickly. A second disk drive 
makes it much easier to make 
backup files by directly 
duplicating your Master Diskette 
or file without first loading the file 
into computer memory. 




ATARI 850™ 
INTERFACE MODULE 
The ATARI 830™ Acoustic 
Modem and the ATARI 825™ 
80-Column Printer connect to 
your ATARI Home Computer 
through the ATARI 850 
Interface Module. The interface 
module offers four program- 
mable serial interface ports 
(compatible with the industry 
standard RS-232-C) and a 
Centronics-type parallel port. 



ATARI MEMORY MODULES' 
The memory of the ATARI 800 
Home Computer can be easily 
expanded (up to 48K of RAM) 
with the addition of ATARI 
Memory Modules. These 
modules are easily installed in 
the slots behind your existing 
10K ROM Memory Module. 



ATARI 830™ 
ACOUSTIC MODEM 
The acoustic modem gives you 
access to local and national data 
bases and data base networks 
through your telephone. You can 
even communicate with another 
ATARI Home Computer user. 
The ATARI 850 Interface Module 
is required to connect the 
modem to your system. 




ATARI 410™ 
PROGRAM RECORDER 
As with the disk drive, you can 
store and retrieve data or pro- 
grams on cassette tape using the 
ATARI 410 Program Recorder. 
Because of the inexpensive cost, 
many programs are sold on 
cassette. The Program Recorder 
also has an audio track that can 
be used to record music or ver- 
bal program instructions that are 
played back while your program 
is loading. 





ATARI 822™ 
THERMAL PRINTER 
This quiet and compact 
40-column printer has a bidirec- 
tional print head that allows it to 
print in both directions. It prints 
5x7 dot-matrix characters on 
thermal paper. The ATARI 822 
Thermal Printer can be con- 
nected directly to your computer 
console. 

ATARI 825™ 
80-COLUMN PRINTER 
The 80-column printer prints a 
line up to eight inches in length 
in four different character 
modes. It is a dot-matrix impact 
printer that can be programmed 
by your computer to produce 
half spacing, underlining, and 
justified right (flush right) 
margins. The printer uses roll 
paper, fanfold (including three- 
part forms), or single sheets. The 
ATARI 825 Printer also requires 
the ATARI 850 Interface Module. 




Now that you have installed your 
new ATARI 810 Disk Drive, you'll 
want to begin using it right away. 
Although connecting the disk 
drive is relatively simple, you'll 
find that learning to use it takes a 
bit longer. 

Included with your disk drive is 
a Master Diskette II. This disk- 
ette contains a program 
called the Disk Operating 
System, or DOS. Although DOS is 
not a complicated program, it 
does take a bit of practice before 
you will feel comfortable with it. 
To help you get going as quickly 
as possible, we have included 
two books about DOS: one is an 
introductory book; the other is a 
detailed reference manual. 




An Introduction to the Disk 
Operating System is for first-time 
users. It explains what DOS is 
and how to use its most important 
features. Once you have read 
this book and followed the 
examples, you'll be able to use 
many DOS functions such as 
saving and loading programs, 
making copies of programs, 
deleting programs from a 
diskette, and copying entire 
diskettes. 



The Disk Operating System II 
Reference Manual is a far more 
detailed and extensive expla- 
nation of DOS. It will be easier to 
understand if you have read the 
other book first. Not only does 
the reference manual cover all of 
the DOS functions, but it does so 
in much greater detail. The ref- 
erence manual also contains a 
wealth of information of par- 
ticular interest to serious pro- 
grammers. 



A 



ATARI 8 

A Warner Communications Company \J 



Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the product documentation in this manual. However, because ATARI, INC. is constantly improving 
and updating the computer software and hardware, we are unable to guarantee the accuracy of the printed material, or accept responsibility for errors 
or omissions after the date of publication. 

No reproduction is allowed without the specific written permission of ATARI, INC., Sunnyvale, CA 94086. Nor can this document or the subject matter 
thereof be reproduced without written agreement or written permission from the Corporation. 

MANUAL CONTENTS © 1981 ATARI, INC. PRINTED IN U.S.A. CO60056 REV. 1